He said she said dating game

a few months later, two children attending the arts camp noticed his photo on an FBI poster at the post office. By then, Shapiro's parents had relocated their entire family to Mexico and refused to allow her to testify at Alcala's trial.

Alcala was paroled after seventeen months, in 1974, under the "indeterminate sentencing" program popular at the time, which allowed parole boards to release offenders as soon as they demonstrated evidence of rehabilitation.

Alcala used his good looks and charm to approach women and used that to his advantage. In 1964, after what was described as a nervous breakdown — during which he went AWOL and hitchhiked from Fort Bragg to his mother's house — he was diagnosed with antisocial personality disorder Other diagnoses later proposed by various psychiatric experts at his trials included narcissistic personality disorder, borderline personality disorder, and (from homicide expert Vernon J.

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A Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals panel nullified the second conviction, in part because a witness was not allowed to support Alcala's contention that the park ranger who found Samsoe's body had been "hypnotized by police investigators".

Additional evidence, including another cold case DNA match in 2004, led to Alcala's indictment for the murders of four additional women: Jill Barcomb, 18, a New York runaway found "rolled up like a ball" in a Los Angeles ravine in 1977, and originally thought to have been a victim of the Hillside Strangler; Georgia Wixted, 27, bludgeoned in her Malibu apartment in 1977; Charlotte Lamb, 31, raped, strangled, and left in the laundry room of an El Segundo apartment complex in 1978; and Jill Parenteau, 21, killed in her Burbank apartment in 1979.

In 1978, Alcala worked for a short time at the Los Angeles Times as a typesetter, and was interviewed by members of the Hillside Strangler task force as part of their investigation of known sex offenders.

Although Alcala was ruled out as the Hillside Strangler, he was arrested and served a brief sentence for marijuana possession.

Rodney James Alcala (born Rodrigo Jacques Alcala Buquor; August 23, 1943) is an American convicted rapist and serial killer.

He was sentenced to death in California in 2010 for five murders committed in that state between 19.

In 1954 his mother moved Alcala and his siblings (two sisters and a brother) to suburban Los Angeles when he was about 11 years old. To evade the resulting arrest warrant, Alcala left the state and enrolled in the NYU film school, using the name "John Berger".

In 1971, he obtained a counseling job at a New Hampshire arts camp for children using a slightly different alias, "John Burger".

During his incarceration between the second and third trials, Alcala wrote and self-published a book, You, the Jury, in which he claimed innocence in the Samsoe case and suggested a different suspect.

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