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“Decide whom of your relatives or friends you will introduce to the Church. Two young men from our Church will give a presentation on how our Church began.” The manual records one convert’s real-life story to prove the point: “Shortly after we moved to a new neighborhood, I was out working in my garden when one of my neighbors offered me a huge armful of tomatoes she had just picked.

My friend and I backed the rented moving truck into the driveway of our family’s new home in Sandy, Utah, a short drive from the headquarters of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) in Salt Lake City. We decided to get some sleep, knowing that some friends were scheduled to come by that afternoon to help.

Sunday is a sacred day for members of the LDS Church; Mormons are not supposed to work or recreate on the “Sabbath.” Since more than two-thirds of Utah’s population is LDS, many stores and restaurants throughout the state are closed on Sunday.

Because our friends’ schedules did not allow for them to help later in the week and the truck was due back, we hoped our new Mormon neighbors (which, it turns out, includes almost everyone on the block) would understand why we had to work on Sunday. I knew that he was a former Mormon bishop who had been very friendly to me during my purchase of the home.

That afternoon, as the back door to the truck rolled open and we began the backbreaking process of unloading, my next-door neighbor—sporting jeans and a T-shirt with a pair of work gloves on his hands—appeared from around the corner. “Imagine,” I thought to myself, “this man is willing to forego his day of rest to help me move.” In one way, I was duly impressed.

Soon after the Cheesemans move into their home, most of the Mormon families from the neighborhood bend over backwards to welcome the brash newcomers with visits and gifts of baked goods.

In addition, it doesn’t take them long to invite this Catholic family to Mormon Church services and activities. You should try it sometime.” “Friendshipping” is an LDS-coined word that emphasizes the building of relationships with non-Mormon friends and neighbors.

SYNOPSIS For many years, members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons) have practiced what they call “friendshipping.” This coined word describes the attitude that Mormons are told to have in their relationships with less active members or those who have no connection whatsoever to the LDS Church.

By going out of their way to do kind gestures, Mormons hope to present a positive image of their church and possibly entice friends and neighbors to enter into the missionary lessons.

“The LDS Church has long realized that simply going door-to-door is one of the least efficient means of finding potential converts,” she said.

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